Diseases

  • Swollen Joints in Angora goatsSwollen joints in both young kids and adults can have different causes.
    Wednesday, 13th March 2019
  • Phytobezoariasis (Plant hair balls)The formation of plant-hair balls (phytobezoars) in the abomasum of Angora goats is an occasional problem in the karoo region. More commonly in the mountain areas of the southern Karoo. Goats are more susceptible than sheep and Boer goats more than A...
    Monday, 26th November 2018
  • Neurological Signs in Angora GoatsNeurological signs in Angora goats are not uncommon in many of the disease processes. The similarities in these clinical signs make it very difficult to determine the underlying cause.
    Monday, 26th November 2018
  • Cretinism (Iodine Deficiency) In Angora Goat KidsCongenital iodine deficiency syndrome also called cretinism, is a condition of severely stunted physical neurological growth due to a congenital deficiency of thyroid hormone (congenital hypothyroidism) usually owing to maternal hypothyroidism.
    Thursday, 1st November 2018
  • Birth abnormalities in Angora kidsBirth abnormalities in Angora kids
    Friday, 18th May 2018
  • Why do Angora goats seem to die more from cold during summer than winter?Angora goats are known to be vulnerable to cold stress, especially for the first 6 weeks after shearing.
    Thursday, 26th April 2018
  • Hypocortisolism in Angora GoatsText extracted from:  A REVIEW OF THE ROLE OF CYTOCHROME P450 17-HYDROXYLASE/17,20 LYASE (CYP17) IN HYPOCORTISOLISM IN SOUTH AFRICAN ANGORA GOATS 
    Tuesday, 20th March 2018
  • BLINDNESS or ‘Apparent Blindness’ in Angora GoatsBlindness or ‘apparent’ blindness in Angora goats can be caused by a number of factors and is often hard to diagnose.
    Friday, 16th March 2018
  • Abortion in Angora goatsAbortions in Angora goats are not uncommon being higher than in sheep. Producers may experience abortions of up to 5% on a regular occurrence.
    Friday, 16th March 2018
  • EYE - BLUE DISCOLOURATION of the surface in an Angora goat.The ‘blueish’ discolouration of the surface of the eye (cornea) can be caused by a number of different factors in Angora goats.
    Monday, 12th March 2018
  • CampylobacterCampylobacter (Campylobacter fetus fetus) is NOT a current reproductive issue in Angora goats but is a major problem effecting fertility in cattle in South Africa (Campylobacter fetus venerealis).
    Monday, 12th March 2018
  • Hairy Shaker Disease (Border disease)Border disease has not been of any significance in Angora goats in South Africa.  In 1972 clinical signs suggested that Border disease may have been involved in abortions and antibody titres have since been detected.
    Monday, 12th March 2018
  • LeptospirosisLeptospirosis has not been diagnosed in Angora goats in South Africa.
    Monday, 12th March 2018
  • NITRATE POISONINGNitrate poisoning is a non-diagnosed but a potential rare poisoning of Angora goats in the Karoo.
    Monday, 12th March 2018
  • ToxoplasmosisToxoplasmosis as a cause of abortion in Angora goats in South Africa has not been diagnosed.
    Monday, 12th March 2018
  • Fly Strike, Myiasis, ‘Brommers’Fly strike, although more of a problem in sheep, does occur in Angora goats in South Africa.
    Tuesday, 6th March 2018
  • CrytosporidiosisCryptosporidiosis is a rare but potential intestinal infection causing diarrhoea in Angora goat kids. Cases of diarrhoea and death have been recorded in Angora goats in Australia. ( Aust Vet J. 1981 Aug;57(8):386-8. Intestinal cryptosporidiosis in a ...
    Thursday, 22nd February 2018
  • Clostridium chauvoeiGas gangrene, Blackquarter, ‘sponsiekte’
    Wednesday, 21st February 2018
  • Clostridium Novyi Type A‘Dikkop’ Swelled head
    Wednesday, 21st February 2018
  • Prolapse of Vagina, Rectum or UterusMohair producers will from time to time see an Angora ewe with a prolapse of the Vagina, rectum or uterus. Vaginal and mild uterine prolapses can occur just prior to kidding season in some ewes. Complete uterine prolapses occurs after kidding.
    Tuesday, 13th February 2018
  • Wednesday, 15th November 2017
  • Floppy Kid SyndromeFLOPPY KID SYNDROME
    Wednesday, 15th November 2017
  • Polioencephalomalacia: Vit B1 deficiency in Angora GoatsPolioencephalomalacia (PEM) - caused by Vit B1 (Thiamine) deficiency simply literally means softening of the brain.
    Tuesday, 14th November 2017
  • Spring Lamb ParalysisTick paralysis is an acute, progressive, symmetrical, ascending motor paralysis caused by a salivary neurotoxin produced by certain species of ticks. See article on The Karoo Paralysis Tick (Ixodes rubicundus) .
    Tuesday, 14th November 2017
  • Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) in goatsThis is currently NOT a disease to concern Angora goat farmers as it has NOT reached South Africa.
    Tuesday, 14th November 2017
  • ‘Domsiekte’, Ketosis, Pregnancy Toxaemia‘Domsiekte’ also called Ketosis is an uncommon condition of Angora goat ewes in the Karoo occurring in late pregnancy. The condition in most cases usually results in death after about 2-10 days.
    Tuesday, 14th November 2017
  • ListeriosisListeriosis  has not been diagnosed in Angora goats in the Karoo and is not economically important. It potentially, but rarely, effects most farm animals as well as humans.
    Tuesday, 14th November 2017
  • PARALYSIS TICK ‘bosluisverlamming’Karoo tick paralysis ‘Karoo-bosluisverlamming’ in Angora goats can occur in large areas of the mohair producing areas of the karoo and surrounding regions.
    Wednesday, 25th October 2017
  • Bloat in Angora GoatsBloat in Angora goats can occur particularly when Lucerne lands are grazed but also when certain toxic plants have been eaten.
    Wednesday, 25th October 2017
  • Joint –ill (Angora Kids)Joint-ill usually occurs in Angora goat kids under a month old and results in the development of swollen joints, lameness and deaths.
    Wednesday, 25th October 2017
  • Hair Obstruction (Trichobezoar) in an Angora goat kidConducting Post Mortems on behalf of SAMGA one often comes across the odd interesting case as happened here while investigating Angora Kid deaths. These young kids (less than 2 months old) were running with ewes on old zero grazing lands during droug...
    Thursday, 21st September 2017
  • Cold (Hypothermia) and the Angora goatA lot of research has been conducted over the years into the aspect of cold, wet and windy conditions due to these losses.
    Friday, 15th September 2017
  • Johne's disease in Angora goatsJohne’s is caused by Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis (MAP) and any ruminant species is susceptible. Johne’s can therefore potentially be a threat to the Angora goat. The disease has however not been diagnosed in Angora goats in South...
    Tuesday, 30th May 2017
  • Footrot 'Vrotpootjie' in Angora GoatsFootrot, also called ’Vrotpootjie’, must not be confused with a foot abscess, also called ‘Sweerklou’, in Angora goats.
    Tuesday, 18th April 2017
  • 'Gallsickness' AnaplasmosisAnaplasmosis, formerly known as ‘gall sickness’, in Angora goats is not of great importance as it is usually a subclinical or mild condition that rarely results in a fever, anaemia, icterus or death. It does however have more of an effect...
    Tuesday, 18th April 2017
  • 'SWELSIEKTE' SWELLING DISEASE IN ANGORA GOATSWhere is all the protein going? Dr Mackie Hobson BSc (Agric) BVSc
    Tuesday, 18th April 2017
  • Graaff-Reinet disease - Maedi-VisnaMaedi-visna or also called Ovine Progressive Pneumonia or Graaff-Reinet disease.
    Tuesday, 18th April 2017
  • Wesselsbron DiseaseWesselsbron disease is usually associated with Rift Valley Fever (RVF) as the conditions and vectors (mosquitos) are similar.
    Tuesday, 18th April 2017
  • Q fever - Coxiella BurnetiiQ fever,Coxiella burnetii, in Angora goats can potentially be associated with abortions and peri-natal deaths although the incidence is unknown and more research is required. The role of Q-fever in abortions is also uncertain as antibodies have been ...
    Tuesday, 18th April 2017
  • Tetanus 'Klem-in-die-kaak' in Angora goatsTetanus is occasionally seen in Angora goats after castration using an elastic ring but infection through any penetrating wound such as after shearing or difficult birth, by the bacteria Clostridium tetani, is possible.
    Tuesday, 18th April 2017

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